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Check out the new student Fall 2021issue of the Ke Alaka'i with information about the campus and community

Click on the link to read online the Fall 2021 new student issue of the Ke Alaka'i:

Resources available for students, such as home visits from a nurse and kits for new babies, help student mothers

Sister LouAnn Randall, a healthcare service missionary from Idaho who has been a nurse for 42 years, said it’s been difficult for new mothers because nobody has been allowed to have their families visit the new babies due to closed borders or travel regulations. “Nobody’s had help,” she explained.

Galeai says her drive, even in the face of setbacks, led her to becoming the first female fireknife soloist at the PCC night show

When Jeralee Galeai was 10 years old, she picked up a stick and wanted to practice fireknife dancing, or siva afi, with her older cousins. She said her father, David Galeai, who was teaching them, saw her potential and started working with her.
Check out the new student Fall 2021issue of the Ke Alaka'i with information about the campus and community
Resources available for students, such as home visits from a nurse and kits for new babies, help student mothers
Galeai says her drive, even in the face of setbacks, led her to becoming the first female fireknife soloist at the PCC night show
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General Young Women leader says navigating the last days requires knowing the tactics of the adversary

To protect themselves from spiritual danger and the ploys of the adversary, the first counselor in the Young Women general presidency encouraged students to actively put on and use the whole armor of God.

Saksak, a BYUH student who has worked as an on-campus security guard for 3.5 years, says employment is about how you care for and serve others

Edmund Saksak has worked as a security guard at both the Polynesian Cultural Center and at BYU–Hawaii since 2017, making him one of the students who has worked the longest in his position.

Kualoa Ranch uses oysters to organically clean its fishpond and newspapers with banana and coconut leaves to grow taro with less weeding

Farmers and researchers are using oysters in a more than 800-year-old loko ia, or fishpond, on Kualoa Ranch, blending Hawaiian heritage and today’s innovation to overcome problems pre-contact Hawaiian farmers did not have to face. The problems include not having enough fish to eat pond algae and a lack of banana and coconut leaves to help grow taro better by keeping down weeds, they said.

Galeai says her drive, even in the face of setbacks, led her to becoming the first female fireknife soloist at the PCC night show

When Jeralee Galeai was 10 years old, she picked up a stick and wanted to practice fireknife dancing, or siva afi, with her older cousins. She said her father, David Galeai, who was teaching them, saw her potential and started working with her.

Tongan student says doing her late father's temple work brought her peace post pandemic

Going to the temple and serving as a witness to her grandparents’ baptisms linked Vaishali Kilaparthi, a senior from India majoring in accounting, to her deceased relatives, she shared. “I was thinking the whole time, ‘These are literal people I’m holding in my hand.'

Telling stories through pixels: Student with a passion for storytelling tells of spending more than 100 hours on a five-minute video

Emilio Valenciano said he prefers making videos over photographs because he likes to tell stories and create an emotional connection with the audience.

BYUH students share dating customs unique to their countries, including who makes the first move and PDA do’s and don’ts

Dating customs from around the world include couple rings, rental dates, sharing a meal and hanging out shared BYU–Hawaii students from Japan, Korea, the Philippines and Nevada.

Returned missionaries adjusted to new cultures by losing themselves in the Lord’s work

Three returned missionaries at BYU–Hawaii spoke of the importance of understanding culture in missionary work. They noted respecting and learning a new culture on their missions helped them feel happy and shared stories and gave advice for prospective missionaries at BYUH.

Pieces of the Past: BYUH Archives houses many Hawaiian artifacts including a stick made for nobility and a weapon made of shark’s teeth

BYU–Hawaii faculty members said learning about the history of the Hawaiian artifacts housed in the school Archives helps people understand the complexities of Hawaiian culture. They affirmed each artifact has its own unique purpose that contributes to Hawaiian history.