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BYUH alumna explains how a hobby of collecting sea glass became her jewelry business

Born and raised in Laie, BYU–Hawaii alumna Anne McCarrey Tobon, said she sees a connection between the sea glass she uses for her jewelry business “Wrap the Sea” and the gospel of Jesus Christ.
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Entire landscaping of BYUH campus was completed on a $10 budget, says 1958 labor missionary yearbook

With only sugar cane fields as a canvas, labor missionaries turned BYU–Hawaii into the thriving ecosystem that it is today. Labor missionaries needed to plant more than 27,000 plants, according to the first labor missionary yearbook published in 1958, which included importing plant species that were not available in Hawaii.
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Tips on reducing waste include reducing fossil fuel use and recycling

Reducing waste means being aware of how our actions will affect the natural environment, says Kumuwaiwai Center for Sustainability Student Supervisor Leslie Harper. He shared different ways students affect their carbon output including the amount of food, gas and electricity they use. “The goal is to reduce our carbon footprint,” he added, which is the amount of carbon output necessary for a person to function.

Kahuku poke shack owner says he was taught by his grandfather to make poke

When his eyes are closed, Ryan Ching said he can see a crystal-clear image of his grandfather: Ching is 5 years old, the baseball game is on and he is sitting on his grandpa’s lap playing with his chest hair and slapping his belly. Ching said he recalls pu pu platters, or trays of appetizers, on the table before them, which consist of pistachio nuts, boiled peanuts and the most important ingredient always present in his grandpa’s pu pu platter: poke.

Hauula resident and volunteer Kenzo Furukawa says it’s up to the individual to create their own space

Hand painted onto the circular ceiling of longtime Hauula community member Kenneth Kenzo Furukawa’s three-story house are these words in Hawaiian: “Be not forgetful to entertain strangers: for thereby some have entertained angels unawares.” The words encircle an angelic scene Furukawa said he decided to paint after seeing many majestic ceilings on his trips to Europe.

How to make Watermelon Pineapple ‘Otai

’Otai (OH-tye) originated in Polynesia and is enjoyed across the region. This recipe is from the Polynesian Cultural Center's website.

Chunky cookies started as a class project but it propelled a young Laie couple into a thriving local business

In 2017, Hali’a Moe said she and her husband, Sterling Moe, visited Utah and tasted cookies from Crumbl and Chip. Intrigued by the taste, Moe said she wanted to figure out why these cookies tasted like nothing she ever had before. “So I was like, ‘I want to try to recreate that,’” she said.

Professor Susan Barton is retiring after more than three decades of helping students find success learning math

Friends and colleagues of BYU-Hawaii Math Professor Susan Barton gathered on the top floor of the new Science Building on the afternoon of June 21 to honor her and the 36 years she has taught at the university.

Campus Comments: What exciting summer break plan are you looking forward to?

Jonathan Crisanto, a freshman majoring in information technology from Batangas City in the Philippines, said he does not have any plans yet. But he said he is prioritizing getting his second part-time job for this summer break. He explained his current job at the Polynesian Cultural Center night show only provides 19 hours while he needs to work for 40 hours during the summer.” I [am] hoping to get into the IT department,” said Crisanto and shared he completed IT certificates to qualify himself for the job.

Spring 2022 issue's Letter from the Editor-in-Chief

There is nothing quite like this little corner of the world. From the early morning crowing of neighborhood roosters to the community members who bleed Red Raider red; from the world-famous surf and “ono” eats to the aunties and uncles whose quiet, little acts of service have shaped our whole world—we love it here. We count it a delight, a blessing and a privilege to study in such a place, especially among people whose North Shore upbringing guides their everyday life and teaches us how to be better.

Family of Laie homeless man urges people to keep their distance, not make him too comfortable he won’t get the help he needs

Ricky, a man who has been sleeping on the sidewalk of Kulanui Street in Laie, has been around for years, said his family, although students said they only began noticing him last semester. He slept at a bus stop in Laie for a few weeks then moved to the wall outside of the BYU–Hawaii campus. Later, when Ricky was banned from the campus, he moved to Kulanui Street where he currently stays.

No one is ever truly alone, says June 2022 student Commencement speaker Vaughn Curioso

Navigating his way through life’s challenges and uncertainties, senior Vaughn Curioso said he didn’t do it alone. The graphic design major from Santa Maria in the Philippines said he got help spiritually from Heavenly Father, support from his family, and even a life-changing conversation with a refugee from the Congo he met on his mission in Utah.