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Ryan Lager, who works for the Honolulu Fire Department, came into the Ke Alaka‘i office for the routine fire safety checks that happen periodically on the BYU–Hawaii campus. Upon inspecting the office, he suggested moving the microwave because it was plugged into an extension cord. He said it was a necessity to have the microwave plugged into a direct outlet to reduce the fire hazard.
The Polynesian Cultural Center was full of cheers, whoops of joy and clapping from spectators watching live and livestreaming the junior and intermediate World Fireknife Championship on April 28.
After the stresses of the global pandemic, an opportunity was presented to share unique cultures with one another and to cheer on brothers and sisters of the BYU–Hawaii ohana from all over the world. The nine chapters that presented their dances at Culture Night 2021 were met with enthusiasm from cheers and smiles from the crowd. The gratitude from the students and faculty participating in the event was unmistakable.
Fire captain at the Honolulu Fire Department said most fires are preventable. Here’s how:
Younger generation follows in the footsteps of their forefathers in the World Fireknife Championship junior and intermediate divisions
After 2020’s Culture Night cancellation, BYUH students across the globe came together as one in the culture of Christ
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BYU–Hawaii students lined around the Cannon Activities Center on the night of May 14 to compete in the Seasider Sports’ Three-point Contest. Competitors had one minute to make as many three-point shots as they could from different areas of the court.
Melba Latu said family, community, people, your profession and the Lord will call on you to teach, lead, direct and serve. When such a call comes, she said, students should say, “Koau’ eni,” a Tongan phrase meaning “I am here.”
Eternal blessings are more important than worldly ones, said Academic Vice President John Bell at a BYU–Hawaii devotional, where he also spoke about the blessings of meeting his wife on a bus ride to BYU in Provo.
The Polynesian Cultural Center was full of cheers, whoops of joy and clapping from spectators watching live and livestreaming the junior and intermediate World Fireknife Championship on April 28.
Playing in Kahuku High School’s band sparked alumnus Eddie Maiava’s love for music and led him to BYU–Hawaii, he said. The Kahuku High School marching band used to practice on the BYUH campus, he said, and after practice one day, shortly before his high school graduation, a music professor invited him to join the University’s band class.
Making deliberate choices every day can become a routine that improves your life and your future, BYU–Hawaii students explain.
The world of design presents many career possibilities for graphic design majors. BYU–Hawaii students said receiving formal training and experience in the field has helped them discover what they want to pursue in the future. Some said they want to be freelance graphics designers so they can be their own boss.
For the Philippines Club presidency and students, they said their dance at BYU–Hawaii’s Culture Night is all about hope. Amid the pandemic, they expressed they sent a message of gratitude and optimism to all those who work hard to keep the world safe.
Remembering the disappointment of last year’s Culture Night cancellation due to the COVID-19 pandemic, students from the Samoan Club expressed gratitude for the student leaders who helped organize this year’s event and shared the personal and cultural significance of their performance.